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Posts Tagged ‘Latifah Saafir’

Celebrating Hoffman Fabrics: 94 Years And Going Strong

Friday, May 4th, 2018

How much do you know about this iconic fabric brand?

Michelle Flores of Hoffman Fabrics shared the following 10 Facts and Figures of the “Hoffman Look” in a $5.00 lecture at Road to California 2018:

1) A family owned and operated business, currently four generations of the Hoffman family run the day to day operations with headquarters in Mission Viejo, California

2) Imaginative fabrics originate with a team of in-house textile artists. Many designs are developed from hand-drawn and hand-painted art. Premium screen-printed and hand-dyed fabrics are manufactured for independent retailers

3) Hoffman searches the world for their premium, high thread count, 100% cotton fabric base.

4) Bali Batiks are a Hoffman exclusive. They have been running their own independent operation in Bali for 35 years. Original, hand drawn designs are put in the computer where designers play with size and repeat. Once perfected, the design is sent to the factory in Bali and re-created on copper stamps which are dipped in wax and applied to the base fabric. Wax does not absorb dye, so designs are left intact. When the dying process is completed, the wax is washed off.5) The minimum order for each Batik design and color is 1,000 yards. Because it takes 6-8 months to develop a Batik fabric, it is recommended that if you love a particular design, buy it when you see it as Hoffman does not duplicate the same design and colors.

6) Interested in their famous Christmas Batiks? These fabrics are delivered to stores in June and July.   

7) Me + You is Hoffman’s modern Batik line. They are mostly solid fabrics with minimal design patterns like these prints created by Latifah Saarfir exclusively for Hoffman Fabrics:8) Can’t find Batiks in your area? Hoffman recommends you first go to your local fabric shop and request what you want. If you still can’t purchase locally, these online retailers carry Hoffman’s line: e-Quilter.com, Batiks Plus, Hancock’s of Paducah, and Nancy’s Notions.

9) For the past 5 years, Digital Prints have become Hoffman’s latest fabric trend. Because a screen-printed fabric can only hold 17-18 colors, the magic of digital printing allows designers to achieve a more realistic effect using more colors. Custom orders for digital prints are honored with a minimum of 500 yards.10) Digital Prints are also made in to panels which can be used for binding and backing or can be cut-up for piecing. Some of their popular panels include the Crazy Panel—all Hoffman fabric challenge prints for the past 30 years. Not sure how to use a digital print panel? Hoffman has free patterns on their website for ideas.

Hoffman Fabrics has lots to celebrate in 2018: Fabulous fabrics, a rich heritage, and their 30th Anniversary of the Hoffman Challenge. Thanks Hoffman Fabrics for allowing Road to California 2018 be the exclusive stop in sharing your successes.      ]]>

Up, Up And Away With Modern Quilts

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

At Road 2018, the Long Beach Modern Quilt Guild created the beautiful quilt exhibit that rose above everyone’s heads as they entered the venue.  The Long Beach Modern Quilt Guild was established in January, 2015 to bring together individuals who are passionate about modern quilting. Their goal is to inspire, educate and develop friendships and they continually strive to use their love of quilting to bridge the needs of our community.   Guild Members were active participants with this year’s Quilts from the Ashes, the initiative created to support the Ventura Modern Quilt Guild’s efforts in supplying quilts to the survivor’s of the  devastating Thomas Fire in Ventura County, California.  Another philanthropy the guild supports is the Memory Pillow program. On the one year anniversary of the passing of a child, the guild makes a memory pillow which is customized to that child and which the hospital presents to the surviving family members.    The Long Beach Modern Quilt Guild is also a member of the worldwide Modern Quilt Guild, founded in 2009 as an online community of modern quilters by one of Road 2018’s vendors, Latifah Saafir.  Road 2018 was Latifah’s first time hosting a retail booth for her Latifah Saafir Studios. She really enjoyed being in front of customers and putting faces to names.   Latifah also hosted a Special Exhibit,  Expanding Traditions. One of the quilts included in the exhibit was Latifah’s first free motion quilt. Because it was her first quilt, there were a lot of mistakes. Latifah felt it was important to show this “not perfect” quilt because learning to quilt is a part of the quilting process.  Thank you Long Beach Modern Quilt Guild and Expanding Traditions for sharing modern quilting with Road 2018 guests.  ]]>

Meet Road 2018 Vendor and Special Exhibit Curator Latifah Saafir

Wednesday, December 6th, 2017

Latifah Saafir Studios LLC is new to Road’s vendor floor, owner Latifah Saafir is not. This innovative Modern Quilter and founder of the Modern Quilt Guild, presented a Lecture and Trunk Show to kick off Road 2017. Her special presentation was held Tuesday evening,  January 17th at the Ontario Museum of History and Art in conjunction with the exhibit being held there, Modern Quilts Redesigning Traditions.  How did Latifah Saafir Studios LLC begin? After Latifah was laid off from her technology job with a Fortune 500 company, she decided to “try my hand at doing something I truly loved.” Already having a ton of contacts in the modern quilt world, Latifah added the resources received from a Kickstarter campaign two years ago to help her launch her product line. Latifah remembers it was a whole lot of work but she wouldn’t have “given up for anything in the world.” A Los Angeles resident, Latifah and her husband help take care of her 96 year old grandfather. Latifah spends most days building her quilting business. When she does have some free time, she likes to slip out to her guild meetings and hang out with her guild friends. What does Latifah like about being a new business owner? Creativity. Latifah loves creating products that help people tap into their own beauty and creativity. Meeting and seeing people is what Latifah is most looking forward to at Road 2018. In her booth, new and classic Latifah Saafir Studios patterns will be featured as well as her Hoffman fabric line. Latifah will also be demonstrating her “Clammy templates,” showing guests how easy it is to cut and sew all kinds of curved shapes. Latifah is also curating the Special Exhibit, Expanding Tradition, which will be located at 713/717 during Road 2018. As Latifah commented, being “surrounded by quilts and quilters for a whole weekend—what could be better than that?!” To learn more about Latifah Saafir Studios LLC, please visit the website.  ]]>

Modern Quilting Unplugged

Saturday, February 4th, 2017

Latifah Saafir, presented a Lecture and Trunk Show during Road to California. She gave the history of Modern Quilting then shared some of her modern quilting work along with some insights on why modern quilting is unplugged i.e.; “cool, hip, original, fascinating, and likeable.”

The 2 A’s of Modern Quilting

Attitude and Aesthetic

One’s Attitude and Approach to modern quilting should be: “I don’t have to be perfect to start.” Never be afraid to try. With Latifah’s first modern quilts, she followed a pattern.Latifah Saafir Modern Quilting Experience brought confidence, where today she makes her own designs. Latifah’s signature pattern is the Glam Clam: clam shells blown up to 12 inches. The Aesthetic of Modern Quilting has distinct qualities that incorporate:

Functionality – Made to snuggle, give as a gift or as artwork

Asymmetry

Reinterpreted Traditional Designs- Take traditional blocks and motifs and mixes it up

Minimalism and Simplicity – which are harder to designLatifah Saafir Modern Quilting

Negative Space

Modern Art and ArchitectureLatifah Saafir Modern Quilting

Improvised yet Intentional Construction

Bold colors, on-trend color combinations, and graphic printsLatifah Saafir Modern Quilting

Gray and White is neutral

Incorporates Solids – cheaper to use and can better express the quilter’s voice

Binding can also be used to frame the quiltLatifah Saafir Modern Quilting

When quilting her own quilts, Latifah shared that she “loves walking foot quilting” with her domestic machine. She encouraged the guests that they “can do it” too. Her tips for walking foot quilting: “Be Conscious. Take Breaks. Have your machine on a table.” In the end, Latifah pointed out, modern quilting is like all quilting: “cutting fabric and sewing it together like everyone else.”      ]]>

Meet Latifah Saafir And Modern Quilting

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

Latifah Saafir, modern quilter, pattern designer, and founder of the Modern Quilt Guild. Her special presentation was held Tuesday evening, January 17th at the Ontario Museum of History and Art in conjunction with the exhibit being held there, Modern Quilts Redesigning Traditions.   The lecture began with Latifah giving a brief history on how the modern quilting movement began in 1998 when it became “cool” to use solid fabrics again. Quilters Gwen Marston and Nancy Crow along with the Quilters of Gee’s Bend and Yoshiko Jinzenji, were some of the artists that championed the return to using solid fabrics. The first modern quilt book was published by Weeks Ringle and her husband Bill Kerr also around 1998. Latifah shared that she “always loved quilts.” While she learned how to quilt from her mother when she was 6 years old, when Latifah got her first sewing machine at age 10, she sewed mostly garments. At age 15, she checked out quilting books from the library. Their designs were basically the traditional, Amish quilt kind. In 2008, Latifah saw her first modern quilt and said to herself, “I can do this.” About the same time Latifah made her first modern quilt, the modern quilting community was also getting started. First, an informal Flickr Group was formed in 2008 to share digital images of the work being created by modern quilters. It was an instant hit among younger quilters. Then, after the Long Beach Quilt Show in 2009, Latifah started the Los Angeles Modern Quilt Guild with 25 members. Other areas around the world wanted to duplicate what the LAMQG started and today there are over 100 guilds worldwide. It’s been almost 10 years since the modern quilting movement began. When asked where does Latifah see the future of modern quilting going, she replied, “Who knows–!!” One thing is for sure: the interest and skill level in modern quilting continues to increase. Jan has been a modern quilter for 7 years and belongs to the Temecula Valley Modern Quilt Guild. She was attracted to modern quilting because it is “non-judgmental.”  She is self-taught, doesn’t use a pattern and just “figures things out.” [caption id="attachment_4666" align="aligncenter" width="625"] (ltor) Sharon and Jan[/caption] Sharon came from Los Angeles and has been quilting just 6 months. She takes classes with Jan. She started quilting after she retired from nursing and has made one baby quilt. She heard about the lecture through Road’s social media and was interested in learning more about modern quilting. Debbie, Maria, and Pat all belong to the Inland Empire Modern Quilt Guild. The guild was started in September 2016 by a group of friends and now has 20 members. They came to the lecture and trunk show because they are big fans of Latifah. Even long-time quilters are turning to modern quilting. Denise lives in Orange County, California and has been quilting for over 30 years. She considered herself a “traditional, Quilt-in-a-Day quilter” and fell into modern quilting because she wanted to do something “different, new, refreshing and colorful.” [caption id="attachment_4676" align="aligncenter" width="625"] Latifah’s signature “Glam Clam”– clam shells blown up.[/caption] Latifah hopes modern quilting will continue to inspire quilters to take ownership for their work and most of all, that it will inspire a new generation of young sewers.]]>