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Archive for the ‘Road to California 2018’ Category

Special Quilt Exhibit: The Work And Wisdom of HERstory Quilts

Wednesday, June 20th, 2018

Road to California prides itself on presenting new and timely Special Quilt Exhibits.

One such Special Quilt Exhibit at Road 2018 was HERstory Quilts – A Celebration of Strong Women. The brainchild of Susanne M. Jones, HERstory “celebrates the amazing things that women everywhere have accomplished since 1920 when women were given the right to vote in the United States.” Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts  The Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts included the work of 85 fabric artists from seven countries. They used fabric, thread, paint, and embellishments to honor strong women – some well-known, some not so much — who cracked glass ceilings, made discoveries, broke into fields previously dominated by men, or were the first to do something.Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts  All work in the Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts were original designs that fit a portrait orientation measuring 24 inches wide and 30 inches long.    Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts  The Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts debuted at Houston Quilt Market in October-November, 2017. Road to California 2018 was its second stop. It is intended that the exhibit will travel for two years.Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts  The quilts are also featured in a 240 page book named after the exhibit, HERstory Quilts – A Celebration of Strong Women.Special Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts  Quilts from the exhibit are organized in the book by theme:

Suffragists: Women who fought for women to receive the vote

Strong Women: Women who did something that was a first for humankind or for womenSpecial Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts

Groups: Women who worked together for a common goal, and

Personal Heroes: A relative or individual admired by the artistSpecial Quilt Exhibit HERstory Quilts

Each quilt highlighted in the book has a description of the woman being portrayed including a brief historical summary of what made her famous. There is also a description of the artist, why she chose the woman to be honored, and what methods were used in the fiber art work she created. Thank you, Susanne M. Jones, for the vision and direction in putting together this Special Exhibit. To see where the exhibit is going next or to purchase the book, please visit Susanne’s website.]]>

A Self-Taught, Hand Quilting Winner

Wednesday, June 13th, 2018

Andrea Stracke won $2,500 for Best Hand Quilting from Sponsor, World of Quilts Travel, for Aragonithand quilting

It was just a matter of time before Germany native, Andrea Stracke, would discover quilting. She had always been interested in trying delicate, hand crafting. Growing up, she spent time experimenting with knitting, crocheting, embroidery, calligraphy, miniature painting and glass grinding.  In 1989, Andrea found a book about patchwork quilts in her favorite book store and from that moment on, she was “hooked.”hand quilting Andrea shares that she is “completely self-taught” when it comes to her quilting. She learned through books and by trial and error. In 1995, she started specializing in making whole cloth and strippy quilts in different sizes after coming across Barbara Chainey’s book, “The Essential Quilter” in 1993.  She said that book “made my heart sing.” Aragonit was inspired by jewelry made in the Belle Époque Era (1884-1914). Andrea said she loves “the beautiful ornaments and scrollwork used for brooches, pendants and other pieces.” Andrea spent 600 hours working on Aragonit. During that time, Andrea became “completely sure” that she was dedicated to hand quilting intricate and detailed hand quilting patterns. She learned on this project the importance of adding intense background quilting to make the main motifs stand out clearly.hand quilting It was early morning in Germany when Andrea received the email from Road to California that was sent at 10:00 PM Pacific Coast Time.  At first, she couldn’t believe what she was reading on her computer. When the realization sunk in, she “shed some tears of joy.” What did Andrea do with her prize money? She bought some fabric, batting and thread to create new quilts. She plans to use the remainder of the money to pay the shipping costs to enter a few more quilt shows in the future. In the future, Andrea plans to keep on making whole cloth and strippy quilts – her real passion. Andrea admits that her designs “are becoming more and more detailed and intricate” and she knows that there is much for her to learn and apply to her upcoming work. “Inspiration is everywhere.” You can learn more about Andrea Stracke on her website.    ]]>

Say Good-Bye To Your Quilt UFO's

Wednesday, May 30th, 2018

a little push to get those quilt UFO’s (Un-Finished Objects) done. All quilters have them. Some are out in the open; some are hidden away. Some cause frustration; some are presumed to never again see the light of day. No matter the reason, a quilt UFO is a nagging reminder that a job wasn’t finished and that someone might be missing out on a really nice, homemade gift. To help solve this dilemma with our guests, Road to California 2018 instituted its first class dedicated to finishing those pesky quilt UFO’s. Titled, Goodbye UFO’s-Hello New Projects, it was led by acclaimed Road teachers, Pat Yamin and Stevii Graves. Of the class, Pat remarked, “We wanted to bring back community sharing in this class; sharing what each other was working on and sharing everyone’s different levels of experience and use of techniques to get the projects done.”finish your quilt UFO's Students were encouraged to bring work they started from home or what they began in classes taught during Road. Sewing machines were provided so that there would be one less excuse for quilters not to finish their project.finish your quilt UFO's

What else did the class offer to encourage quilt UFO success?

A quiet, dedicated time to work.finish your quilt UFO's

A cell phone free zone to avoid distraction.

Rewards for showing up (everyone got goodie bags filled with sewing gear from Primm USA) and for hanging in there (throughout the evening, students won door prize giveaways donated by Pat and Stevii).finish your quilt UFO's

One of the door prize winners was Gwendolyn Humphries from Victorville, California. She has been quilting for 3 years when she found more free time after retiring from a career as a Speech Therapist for the San Bernardino County Schools. Gwendolyn signed up for this class because “I have a lot of stuff to finish. I knew Pat could help me if I got stuck.” Gwendolyn has been to Road to California the past 3 years and “loves it.” She said she loves trying new things, especially new machines, when she takes classes.  finish your quilt UFO's Fontana, California resident, Angelica Reyes, took Lee Chappell Monroe’s Blooming Dresden class and was looking forward to having quilting experts Stevii and Pat share their knowledge in helping her finish up the class project. Do you have any quilt UFO’s waiting to be finished? Try these class reminders: finish your quilt UFO's    ]]>

Going To Road’s Quilt Show Is Always A Holiday

Saturday, May 26th, 2018

Road to California is always scheduled the week of the Martin Luther King Holiday.

Anytime you plan to meet friends at Road’s Quilt Show, it’s like creating your own special holiday:quilt show friends Robert Tucker and Patricia Young are quilt guild friends. They belong to the Coachella Valley Quilt Guild which meets in Palm Desert, California. Robert lives in Palm Springs year-round while Patricia is a “snowbird” who resides in Wisconsin. Road to California was the first quilt show Patricia ever attended and she’s been hooked ever since her first show in 2014. Patricia likes how convenient Road to California is to get to. She enjoys seeing the varied work on display and all the places to shop while at the show. Robert has joined Patricia at the quilt show the last 3 years. He likes seeing fellow guild members’ work on display. At Road 2018, three members of the guild had quilts entered in the quilt show. Robert is an artist but when he moved to the desert he wanted to try something new and meet new people. While attending the Big Bear Quilt Show, they put him in touch with the Coachella Valley Guild and Monica’s Quilt and Bead Creations (one of Road to California’s popular vendors). He likes how quilting has become another way to express his artistic talent.quilt show friends Simone and Dianne are both originally from the Bay Area although Simone has since moved to Pomona, California. They met and became friends through Simone’s mom who is Dianne’s best friend. Dianne has been quilting for four years. Her grandmother was a quilter and it was something Dianne always wanted to try. She finds quilting to be very relaxing. Road 2018 was the first time Dianne had come to the show and she wanted to bring Simone with her. They couldn’t believe how “gigantic” the quilt show was. Simone said she could tell a lot of work went in to each piece on display.quilt show friends Elaine and Pat say that Road to California is a great place to have “great friend time.” “We wouldn’t want to go to Road without each other,” remarked Elaine. They take classes and share with each other what they have learned during their time at the quilt show. They also enjoy attending Preview Night to see all the quilts on display without the daily crowds. Elaine has been coming to Road for ten years and Pat for eight. “Road has everything we want in one place,” said Elaine.quilt show friends Val and Mary Beth have traveled together from St. Paul, Minnesota to attend the quilt show the past five years. They met while teaching for the same school district; Mary Beth taught Special Education and Val taught Home Economics. Both are long time quilters who like seeing all the different quilts and accessories that they don’t usually find in Minnesota. Have you made your friendship “holiday plans” to visit Road to California 2019?    ]]>

Behind Road To California 2018's Outstanding Modern Quilt

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

Direction Optional was made by Stephanie Z. Ruyle and the 2016 members of Bee Sewcial. It was quilted by Christine Perrigo. They received $2,500 from Sponsor, Modern Quilts Unlimited.modern quilts quilt show

Many quilters start out first as garment makers and Stephanie Ruyle is no exception. “I love it when I can use a garment making skill/technique in quilt making,” shared Stephanie.  modern quilts quilt showThe idea for Direction Optional was based around the concept of linear— using the line in piecing, whether straight or curved. Each Bee Sewcial Member was given this directive as they created their own improv block. The color palette was chosen to keep the composition cohesive. The pops of color help move the eye around the quilt top. Stephanie said that “curating the placement of each member’s block and making the connecting pieces that brought all the varied pieces together into a pleasing whole was both challenging and thrilling.”modern quilts quilt show

Placing the blocks and the irregular pieces together took several months to complete. Stephanie felt “very lucky” to utilize the creative talents from nine of her “Bee-mates.” Seeing their diverse interpretations of the prompt and then how they all came together proved to Stephanie that the “sum is really greater than its parts.” The quilting was done by Colorado longer quilter, Christine Perrigo, and took another several weeks to finish.modern quilts quilt show Stephanie was at home when she received the email saying that she had won. She had to read it several times before it sunk in. Winning in the Outstanding Modern Quilt category was really special because Stephanie had originally entered it in the Abstract Category. She used her prize money to update her “aging cell phone” and will save the rest for later. What is next with Stephanie’s quilting? “There are definitely more modern quilts in my future, and hopefully more quilt shows as well.” She loves spreading the word about modern quilts and its growing contributions to the greater quilting community by creating quilts that inspire ideas and start conversations. Congratulations to Stephanie and her Bee Sewcial friends for their Road 2018 winning entry.    

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How Sharp Are Your Quilting Scissors?

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

quilting scissors, quilt show While Kai Scissors are sold in stores, the company enjoys going to a quilt show like Road to California to meet with customers face to face. Jeff Belvill, Director at Kai Scissors, says that they always have an overwhelming response from consumers when they try out in person Kai’s line of scissors, knives, and beauty tools.quilting scissors, quilt show What are Kai’s most popular quilting scissors? Their Professional 7000 series, especially the 7230.quilting scissors, quilt show The 7230 is a 9-inch professional scissor, ideal for thicker, more difficult fabrics. Considered a light weight scissor, it is suited for people with smaller hands and is effective for any project. When at Road’s 2018 quilt show, Jeff offered these tips on how to care for your quilting scissors and keep them sharp for optimum use:

Choose the Right Scissor for the Jobquilting scissors, quilt show

Use your scissors for the function they were designed to do. Fabric scissors should only be used on fabric like paper scissors should only be used for paper.

Sharpen the Blade all the Way to the Tip

Any reputable sharpener can sharpen your scissors safely.

Wipe Scissors Down

Use a microfiber cloth to wipe the blades when you are done with each cutting project. Start from the underside, pinch and pull the cloth across the blade.

Keep the Pivot Working Smoothlyquilting scissors, quilt show

Spray rubbing alcohol in the pivot and wipe away any goo or fibers that might get stuck.

Use a Tip Protector

When not in use, prevents ruining tips from accidental drops on the floor.

Never Run with Scissors

A safety tip that hopefully doesn’t any reminders. To learn more great quilting scissors information, visit the Kai website. Also, you can also listen to Jeff talk  in depth about the History of Scissors on a recent podcast he recorded with YurView: ]]>

Meet The Beach Cities Quilters Guild

Monday, May 14th, 2018

Past President Sherri Peltier remarked that their guild “gives so much.” Anywhere from 60 – 100 quilts are donated each month to military bases in San Diego for their military mother baby showers. Each prospective mother and her yet-to-be born baby receive a quilts at these events.  Another popular philanthropy is Quilts of Valor. In 2017, the guild donated 1,500 quilts to this organization. The quilts are presented to the soldiers as they get off the airplane and each soldier gets to pick which quilt he or she wants. New member Jeanette Floyd joined the guild last year and is a new quilter. She became interested in the guild through their philanthropy work, particularly the Angel Baby project. Guild members sew diaper, hat and blanket sets. One set goes to the mother as a keepsake and the other set is buried with the baby. A new philanthropy the guild has just formed a partnership with is the National Institute of Health in Bethseda, Maryland. The Institute treats children with rare diseases. The guild became familiar with the Institute’s work because Sherri’s granddaughter is treated there. Guild members are working on making teddy bears for the patients. FantaSea of Quilts is the theme for the Beach City Quilters Guild Quilt Show and Auction which is being held June 2-3 at the Soka University Gymnasium in Aliso Viejo. Their Opportunity Quilt that will be given away at the show, Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows.  The guild reports that this “stunning” quilt has had so many wonderful comments as it has traveled to other guilds and was a huge hit at Road to California.   One of the guilds that hosted the quilt was the Friendship Square Quilt Guild in March. It was Beach City’s fifth time attending their show. They appreciated the opportunity FSQG gave them to share Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows.” Quilt Guilds have a goal to support each other and share the tradition of quilting especially to a new generation of fabric artists,” said member Elaine. Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows was made with Kaffe Fassett Fabrics. Sixteen hand applique quilters made the blocks and Sherri Peltier put it together. The quilting was done by Cecelia Quilts in Orange County, California. To learn more about the guild and their quilt show, visit their website.       ]]>

Mothers Who Share the Love of Quilting

Wednesday, May 9th, 2018

These moms share their legacy of quilting by going to Road to California with their daughters.

Debra has been quilting for 11 years and has been attending Road to California just as long. She is a long arm quilter and likes seeing thread and fabric in person. Her daughter, Nicole, came with her to Road 2018 to “support my mom. She is really good at quilting.” Beate loves to share her German heritage and her love of quilting with her daughter, Alison. Beate makes her own designs which she describes as “wonky style” She doesn’t care if her work is perfect; she enjoys the creative aspect of quilting most of all. Beate first taught Alison to quilt in 1976 when Alison was in the 3rd grade. It was a “sailboat improve” that they “threw together.” Both women got away from quilting for a while and picked it up again when Alison was in college. They joined the San Diego Modern Quilt Guild and go to all kinds of retreats together. “We enjoy bright, happy modern quilts,” remarked Beate. They have attended Road to California for over 5 years. Alison looks for the “complicated” quilts on display and in the classes offered. “The more complicated, the more interested I am in the quilt,” she remarked. Kathie and Laura choose Road to California as a place to meet up. Kathie lives in Surprise, Arizona and Laura lives in Riverside, California. Kathie started quilting in 1982, buying fabric to make a log cabin design. It remained a UFO until 2017 when she finally finished it!!  She is quick to note, “I made a bazillion quilts in-between.” Kathie likes the inspiration she gets from attending Road. As for Laura, she likes to help her mom find new ideas, spend money and see all the new products.  Chatting with other people at the show is also fun for Laura. “I made an Instagram friend last year with one of the vendors.” Will we be seeing you and your mom at Road 2019?  ]]>

Celebrating Hoffman Fabrics: 94 Years And Going Strong

Friday, May 4th, 2018

How much do you know about this iconic fabric brand?

Michelle Flores of Hoffman Fabrics shared the following 10 Facts and Figures of the “Hoffman Look” in a $5.00 lecture at Road to California 2018:

1) A family owned and operated business, currently four generations of the Hoffman family run the day to day operations with headquarters in Mission Viejo, California

2) Imaginative fabrics originate with a team of in-house textile artists. Many designs are developed from hand-drawn and hand-painted art. Premium screen-printed and hand-dyed fabrics are manufactured for independent retailers

3) Hoffman searches the world for their premium, high thread count, 100% cotton fabric base.

4) Bali Batiks are a Hoffman exclusive. They have been running their own independent operation in Bali for 35 years. Original, hand drawn designs are put in the computer where designers play with size and repeat. Once perfected, the design is sent to the factory in Bali and re-created on copper stamps which are dipped in wax and applied to the base fabric. Wax does not absorb dye, so designs are left intact. When the dying process is completed, the wax is washed off.5) The minimum order for each Batik design and color is 1,000 yards. Because it takes 6-8 months to develop a Batik fabric, it is recommended that if you love a particular design, buy it when you see it as Hoffman does not duplicate the same design and colors.

6) Interested in their famous Christmas Batiks? These fabrics are delivered to stores in June and July.   

7) Me + You is Hoffman’s modern Batik line. They are mostly solid fabrics with minimal design patterns like these prints created by Latifah Saarfir exclusively for Hoffman Fabrics:8) Can’t find Batiks in your area? Hoffman recommends you first go to your local fabric shop and request what you want. If you still can’t purchase locally, these online retailers carry Hoffman’s line: e-Quilter.com, Batiks Plus, Hancock’s of Paducah, and Nancy’s Notions.

9) For the past 5 years, Digital Prints have become Hoffman’s latest fabric trend. Because a screen-printed fabric can only hold 17-18 colors, the magic of digital printing allows designers to achieve a more realistic effect using more colors. Custom orders for digital prints are honored with a minimum of 500 yards.10) Digital Prints are also made in to panels which can be used for binding and backing or can be cut-up for piecing. Some of their popular panels include the Crazy Panel—all Hoffman fabric challenge prints for the past 30 years. Not sure how to use a digital print panel? Hoffman has free patterns on their website for ideas.

Hoffman Fabrics has lots to celebrate in 2018: Fabulous fabrics, a rich heritage, and their 30th Anniversary of the Hoffman Challenge. Thanks Hoffman Fabrics for allowing Road to California 2018 be the exclusive stop in sharing your successes.      ]]>

So You Want To Make A Winning Quilt: Outstanding Wall Quilt

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

Robin Gausebeck received $5,000 from Sponsor, Janome, for Art of the Ancient World at Road to California 2018

Robin Gausebeck did not set out to be a quilter, let alone an award winning quilter.

A few years ago, when Robin moved in to a new house, there was a tall blank wall in the stairwell that needed some color. She thought she could find “a nice long piece of fabric, hang it up and be done.” Only problem: she couldn’t find anything that she and her husband liked. In her search, however, Robin DID find a book by Pamela Mostek called “Just Can’t Cut It” which featured simple quilts that Robin figured she could attempt to make. After all, thought Robin, she did know how to use a sewing machine!!  That first quilt, which she revised to measure 4′ x 8’, was full of beautiful Asian fabrics but Robin felt that her “workmanship was atrocious since I really didn’t know what I was doing.” Consequently, her personal embarrassed kept her from letting anyone else see that quilt.  However, the process of using a variety of fabrics and colors fascinated her and she knew she wanted to do more. What inspired Robin to make Art of the Ancient World? About 8 years ago, she and her husband were passing through Lincoln, Nebraska. They stopped at the International Quilt Study Center and viewed a collection of Baltimore album quilts.  They weren’t Robin’s “thing” but her husband was fascinated with the style and began mentioning to Robin how much fun it would be for her to make an album quilt.  After listening to his hints over the years, Robin decided that it would be “okay for me to do an album quilt but it was going to be on my terms.” Although Robin didn’t consider herself a “folk-art person,” she always had been interested in art history and figured that she could pull design inspiration from the decorative arts of early civilizations from around the globe. Art of the Ancient World took over two years to complete. Some of that time, Robin spent researching in libraries, on the internet and with her own art books trying to design each of the 16 blocks.  After she made the first two blocks, Robin hit a creative wall and put the quilt aside for about 6 months until she determined that she had to finish it. Robin shared that she learned a lot from making this quilt. She learned a lot about art history that she hadn’t known before. She learned some new quilting techniques. And she learned that “I will probably never make another quilt like this as long as I live!!” When Robin received the email about winning, it was after a long day during which she and her husband realized that they would have to say goodbye to the last of the many loved cats they had owned over the years.  Robin had actually forgotten about when Road would be sending the notifications out so she was totally blindsided when the email said that she had won. She said that she “actually screamed out loud” when she read the email and then “rushed to tell my husband since this really is ‘his’ quilt.” While Robin would love to say that she spent her prize money on fabric, a new machine, or a quilt retreat, she actually applied it to some household maintenance. She hopes to also spend some of her winnings on “a nice dinner and bottle of wine, too.” What does Robin plan to work on in the future? “I have more ideas for quilts than I will ever have time to do.  I love color and form so I think I’d like to veer off in the direction of more abstract work but who knows?  An interesting idea (actually a title since that’s how most of my quilts start) may pop into my head and I’ll go off in another direction entirely.” Congratulations Robin Gausebeck for winning Road 2018’s Outstanding Wall Quilt.  ]]>